Mentally Ill People Are Dying in Prisons

Christopher Lopez

Still shot from the video of the final hours of Mr. Lopez’s life

One by one, mentally ill people are dying behind prison walls. One of the latest atrocities is the death of 35-year old Christopher Lopez, a man with schizoaffective disorder who died in the presence of Colorado Department of Corrections prison staff who were too busy laughing and making small talk to pay him any attention.

Christopher Lopez died of hyponatremia, a condition associated with dangerously low levels of sodium. It’s often thought to be caused by too much psychotropic medication. The lawsuit notes that in almost all instances, it’s a condition that’s treatable with prompt and adequate medical attention.

A six-hour video exists in which Mr. Lopez dies right before their eyes–a video that could “ultimately… pass as a documentary film on how to ignore the obvious and serious medical needs of the dying prisoner for hours until the very last breath of life leaves his body…”

The video provides “crystal clarity” of what happened in the final moments of Mr. Lopez’s life.

“We can see the defendants wheel a semiconscious Mr. Lopez down to the intake area of the prison and eventually remove him from the restraint chair. We have a ringside seat to watch Mr. Lopez suffer two grand mal seizures in front of the camera while the defendants idly stand about and discuss their views about Wal-Mart and other equally important topics, laughing and joking with one another, all the while completely ignoring the dying man in their charge. We watch as defendants leave Mr. Lopez face down, still fully restrained, on the floor of the intake cell, too weak to hold his own body upright. We see Mr. Lopez struggling to breathe for hours, and then, finally, we have an unobstructed view as Mr. Lopez takes his last breath, dying, half naked on the cold concrete floor of a prison cell– isolated and alone with no defendant caring whether he lived or died.”

The lawsuit alleges that the Colorado prison officials wanted to punish the prisoner for kicking a correctional officer and were “not interested in finding an appropriate treatment plan” for his severe mental illness.

The lawsuit notes that in the final hours of Mr. Lopez’s life, there were a minimum of 16 correctional staff members whom he encountered yet not one of them took any steps to save his life.

What many people may not realize is that this could happen to their mentally ill brother, sister, father, mother, son or daughter. Because the mental health system is in shambles, many people who would otherwise be in hospitals receiving the proper care and treatment are now in prison. Correctional staff, who receive little or no training about how to handle mentally ill people, are now in charge of their care and often view their symptoms or their unresponsiveness as behavioral problems that need to be punished, mostly with solitary confinement.

There are probably many more horror stories that we don’t hear about or that are buried within the pages of civil lawsuits. Until something is done, and we stop criminalizing mental illness, incarcerated mentally ill people will continue to suffer.

Parents of Mentally Ill Psych Hospital Shooter Blog About the Incident

Two Interesting News Stories

Sea of Heartbreak: Blog Post By Parents Of Killer John Shick Leaves More Questions Than Answers

Source: Pittsburgh Post Gazette

The above article is about a blog post by the parents of a schizophrenic man John Shick who killed one person and wounded 5 others on a shooting spree at a large psychiatric facility in Pittsburgh, PA on March 8, 2012. You can read the entire blog post by his parents here. It is very interesting to read the words of his parents. You don’t often have access to such materials.

Shick had a history of schizophrenia and was involuntarily committed four times since 2005. His parents stated that he would often stop taking his medication, and “over the last years [their relationship] was difficult at best, as he became increasingly surly, withdrawn, and verbally abusive, though never physically threatening.”

John Shick was killed by police on the day of the incident.

Voices from Solitary: “The SHU Is California’s Equivalent of Waterboarding”


Continuing with their “Voices of Solitary” chronicles, this article is written by an inmate in Pelican Bay State Prison’s Security Housing Unit (SHU). Inmates in SHU spend on average 22 1/2 hours in a cell alone, for an average of over 6 years. Very powerful.