Teen With Schizophrenia Shot and Killed By Police In Front of Family

18-year-old Keith Vidal was shot and killed by a police officer Sunday when authorities responded to a call for help from family members. Keith was in the midst of a schizophrenic episode.

According to early reports, Keith had picked up a small screwdriver and refused to put it down, an action which prompted the family to call police. Initially, two officers arrived on the scene. The following events, which ultimately led to Keith being shot, are not fully clear.

According to Keith’s father, “…all of a sudden, this Southport cop [the third officer to arrive on the scene], walked in the house [and said]: ‘I don’t have time for this. Tase him. Let’s get him out of here.”

The officer used a stun gun on Keith who, “hit the ground [and then] this guy shot him,” Keith’s father reported.

Shots were fired “seconds” after the third officer arrived.

Keith was declared dead soon after being rushed to the hospital.

When Keith’s father demanded to know why his stepson was shot, the officer said “well, I’m protecting my officers.”

Keith’s mother Mary told reporters that she had often tried to get help for her son’s mental illness. Apparently, to no avail.

The current mental health system is in shambles and it’s been this way for some time, especially for people with serious mental illnesses. There are now more people residing in jails and prisons across the United States, than in psychiatric hospitals. The Los Angeles County Jail, for instance, is considered the largest defacto psychiatric facility.

Police shootings of people with mental illnesses is not a new phenomenon. An investigation by the Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegraph uncovered “that at least half of the estimated 375 to 500 people shot and killed by police each year in this country have mental health problems.”

Their investigation also revealed that in the state of Maine, the Attorney General’s Office, which investigated all of the police shootings, never found one of the shootings to be unjustified.

There are also no federal statistics about police shootings of mentally ill people.

I have worked with many police officers who were called upon to deal with severely mentally ill people. Some felt that it wasn’t their job to deal with “those people” but many others were kind, compassionate and patient with those of whom they were attempting to help.

Studies show that police officers who have undergone crisis intervention training (CIT), are better able to effectively de-escalate a mental health crisis. CIT should be mandatory for all law enforcement officials, at least until they are no longer the front-line responders in mental health emergencies.

Keith’s parents have said that the policeman who shot their son is a cold-blooded murderer.

Keith’s parents said they cannot understand what happened.

“Where is the justice, why did they shoot my son? This is what’s wrong with our mental health system.”

The authorities are investigating the events.

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The Jodi Arias Trial: Jodi, Insanity and the Death Penalty

Recently, the head prosecutor in Maricopa County said that he was open to negotiating a deal in the Jodi Arias case. He would consider taking the death penalty off the table in exchange for life without parole. Whether or not a deal is struck, depends at least in part, upon how the victims’ family wants to proceed. Clancy Talbott, speaking on behalf of the Alexander family, told Shepard Smith of Fox news that they want to see Jodi Arias on death row. If there is no deal, a new jury will be convened this summer to decide her fate. … Read more

Successful and Schizophrenic

The New York Times features an article by Elyn Saks entitled “Successful and Schizophrenic.” Elyn Saks is a university professor, [amazon_link id=”1401309445″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]an author[/amazon_link], a researcher and the recipient of the MacArthur foundation genius grant. She also has schizophrenia and has clearly experienced a great deal of success in her life. bulb

In the article, she describes the research that she and her colleagues have conducted with 20 highly successful individuals with schizophrenia who manage their delusions and hallucinations. Some utilize cognitive techniques. For instance, one individual would ask himself these questions when he began to experience hallucinations:

“What’s the evidence for that? Or is it just a perception problem?”

One individual would simply “blow off” their derogatory voices.

Another individual felt that it was important to identify his or her triggers for the purpose of preventing a “full blown experience of symptoms.”

Other helpful strategies for minimizing symptoms included: minimizing sensory outputs, exercising, working, getting the proper sleep, developing a healthy diet, avoiding alcohol, and engaging in prayer.

The author is careful not “romanticize” schizophrenia. She recognizes that it is a serious disorder. In her case she also takes medication which has helped her tremendously.

“I don’t want to sound like a Pollyanna about schizophrenia; mental illness imposes real limitations, and it’s important not to romanticize it. We can’t all be Nobel laureates like John Nash of the movie “A Beautiful Mind.” But the seeds of creative thinking may sometimes be found in mental illness, and people underestimate the power of the human brain to adapt and to create.”

Read the rest of Successful and Schizophrenic

Clinical Terms In The News, Related to the Colorado Shooting

In light of what many are calling the largest mass shooting in U.S. history, you will likely be hearing many reports about the clinical and psychological status of the shooter. At this time, there have been no reports about his clinical or psychological status but mental health professionals have been speculating about it in the news. Below is a list of clinical terms and information that you may be hearing about or may be wondering about, in relation to the Colorado shooter.

Schizophrenia: Schizophrenia is a severe and debilitating thought disorder that is diagnosed in less than 2% of the United States population. Symptoms of the disorder include: having a break with reality, illogical thoughts and extreme emotional and social dysregulation, among others. The probability of developing schizophrenia is relatively low compared to other mental health disorders.

The perception of individuals with schizophrenia being violent remains strong in our society. The facts do not match that perception. Individuals with schizophrenia are no more dangerous than the average person except under four conditions that increase the likelihood for violence. Those four conditions include:

1. Having a history of violence
2. Actively using drugs and alcohol
3. Off medication and actively psychotic
4. Lack of insight into one’s mental illness

Those conditions may increase the likelihood of violence but they do not guarantee violence. It is difficult (and in fact may not be possible) to accurately predict who is going to be violent and under which conditions.

The National Institute of Mental Health states the following about schizophrenia and violence:

“Most violent crimes are not committed by persons with schizophrenia and most persons with schizophrenia do not commit violent acts.”

Individuals with schizophrenia are more likely to be victims of violence rather than perpetrators of violence.

Schizophrenia is often confused with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), which was formerly called multiple personality disorder.

Dissociative Identity Disorder: DID symptoms include: the presence of two or more identities, at least two of these identities recurrently take control of the person’s behavior and having an inability to recall personal information. DID is very rare and is diagnosed in less than 1% of population.

The Bottom Line: Schizophrenia is not DID and multiple personality disorder is now called DID.

Psychosis: Psychosis is a break with reality. An individual who is psychotic might hear voices, see things that are not real or believe that someone is following them. The voices associated with psychosis are generally negative. The voices may be telling an individual to harm themselves or someone else. The voices can be very unpleasant and frightening.

Psychosis is associated with mental health disorders such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, psychotic disorder not otherwise specified (NOS), and several others.

An individual can have a psychotic break and never have another. In clinical terms, that is called Schizophreniform disorder.

Psychopath: According to research by Hare and Newman, psychopaths are:

  • shallow,
  • deceptive,
  • grandiose,
  • dominant,
  • superficial,
  • manipulative,
  • are unable to establish emotional bonds,
  • lack empathy, guilt, and remorse,
  • are social deviants, impulsive and ignore the norms of society.

Many clinicians and researchers believe that psychopaths are untreatable.

Psychopath is a term used interchangeably with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), sociopathy, and psychopathy but they are not same, at least technically (and according to Hare). Research shows, according to Hare, that most people with ASPD are not psychopathic but most psychopathic individuals meet the current diagnostic criteria for ASPD. Despite Hare’s contention that psychopaths and individuals with ASPD are very different, some researchers contend that both psychopaths and individuals with ASPD are virtually the same.

Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD): Antisocial personality disorder is characterized by difficulty interacting with others or lacking the desire to interact with others. Individuals with antisocial personality disorder are typically not shy. On some occasions, they can be charismatic. Ted Bundy, who is considered by many to be a “textbook” case of ASPD, was generally well-liked.

Individuals with ASPD lack empathy, tend to be arrogant, are excessively opinionated, can be charming, and engage in aggressive or criminal acts. There are also characteristically irresponsible, frequently manipulative, impulsive, and have no regard for others.

The aforementioned are some of the terms and phrases that you will likely hear discussed in reference to the Colorado shooter, and in other cases of a similar nature.

Schizophrenia & Violence: What Are The Facts?

I remember speaking with a client with schizophrenia who, for her entire life, had [amazon_link id=”0967718937″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]denied that she had the illness[/amazon_link]. For many years, she would not even allow a conversation between us about schizophrenia. The topic was simply off-limits.

One day, she was talking about viewing a Law & Order television episode in which an individual with schizophrenia had killed someone. That led us to a conversation about schizophrenia and violence. I delicately broached the subject of why she would never admit to having schizophrenia. She stated that she didn’t think she had schizophrenia because she “never killed anyone.”

The perception of individuals with schizophrenia being violent remains strong in our society. The facts do not match that perception. Individuals with schizophrenia are no more dangerous than the average person except under four conditions that increase the likelihood for violence. Those four conditions include:

1. Having a history of violence

2. Actively using drugs and/or alcohol

3. Being off medication and actively psychotic

4. Having a [amazon_link id=”0967718937″ target=”_blank” container=”” container_class=”” ]lack of insight [/amazon_link]into one’s mental illness

Those conditions may increase the likelihood of violence but they do not guarantee violence. It is difficult to accurately predict who is going to be violent and under which conditions.

The National Institute of Mental Health states the following about schizophrenia and violence: “Most violent crimes are not committed by persons with schizophrenia and most persons with schizophrenia do not commit violent acts.”

Individuals with schizophrenia are more likely to be victims of violence rather than perpetrators of violence.